SCI-ART LAB

Science, Art, Litt, Science based Art & Science Communication

Information

Art Market

Members: 6
Latest Activity: Aug 16, 2015

"Art is not what you see, but what you make others see."- Edgar Degas

"You never know the reason why such and such a canvas is bought, it depends too much on the mood and state of mind of the buyers. Painting is intrinsically a market of love; it is difficult to reason when one is struck by that disease."
-- Art dealer Paul Rosenberg, quoted in Georges Braque: A Life by Alex Danchev, page 164.

Discussion Forum

10 Most Bizarre And Expensive Paintings In The World

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Oct 19, 2013. 0 Replies

1 Paul Cezanne (The card Players) Price: $250 million #2 Pablo Picasso (The dream)Price: $155 million#3 Jackson Pollock (Number 5)Price: $140 million#4 Willem De Kooning (Woman III)Price: $137.2…Continue

How the Art Market Works

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by lucia mesquita bleasby May 11, 2012. 1 Reply

Source: Boston GlobeIn September of 2008, the British artist Damien Hirst sold a collection of his own…Continue

Internet marketing quotes

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Jan 31, 2012. 2 Replies

101 Awesome Marketing QuotesView more presentations from…Continue

Qatar is the world's biggest contemporary art buyer!

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Jul 8, 2011. 0 Replies

The small, energy-rich state is behind most of the major modern and contemporary art deals over the past six yearsDOHA. The small but energy-rich Gulf state of Qatar is the world’s biggest buyer in…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Art Market to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on August 16, 2015 at 9:18am

5 Opportunity Sites Every Artist Should Know About
https://www.artworkarchive.com/blog/5-opportunity-sites-every-artis...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on June 6, 2015 at 6:09am

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on June 20, 2014 at 6:43am

Why Auction Rooms Seem Empty These Days
Bidders Aren't Lacking, They Just Phone It In or Go Online
http://online.wsj.com/articles/with-absentee-bidding-on-the-rise-au...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on January 1, 2014 at 9:13am

Marketers need to regard marketing as a science and not an art

I think the biggest shift that marketers need to make is to regard marketing as a science and not an art. Brands have the ability to leverage data to be contextual and predictive. They can serve consumers with the right message at the right time: marketing a cold drink on the hottest day for instance. With the proliferation of mobile devices and targeting, it's moving into a predictive space. Data is so robust that brands can start to predict what consumers want even before they think it and g ..

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/features/brand-equity/marketers...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on December 24, 2013 at 6:55am

Galleries, Shows and Exhibitions – Art Gallery Contracts
http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/galleries-shows-and-exhibitions-art...

If your art is not selling.... think about these things:

http://artprintissues.com/2014/04/26/five-reasons-selling-art-oppor...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on December 20, 2013 at 8:48am

The science behind investing in the art world

Devoting a small proportion of your portfolio to more niche assets can have diversification benefits and an investment in art is a good example.

http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/business/business-opinion/trevor-la...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on October 21, 2013 at 7:03am

http://creativesandbusiness.com/2873-art-marketing-the-promotion-pa...
Art Marketing – The Promotion Part of the 4P’s

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 29, 2013 at 9:24am
Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 19, 2013 at 8:03am

The Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) posits that when people are motivated and able to carefully evaluate messages they tend to be persuaded by central aspects of a message (e.g., the strength of its arguments). In contrast, when they are not motivated or able to elaborate, they tend to be persuaded by more peripheral aspects of a message (e.g., the attractiveness or professional credentials of a speaker). Groundbreaking work by psychologist Shelly Chaiken and others emerged around the same time making similar claims. These theories were a watershed moment in the field, and have been proven to be hugely powerful and influential frameworks for understanding persuasion across a variety of contexts and fields.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/2013/09/16/the-...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 19, 2013 at 7:26am

http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/104/6/1060/
Attitudes without objects: Evidence for a dispositional attitude, its measurement, and its consequences.
Hepler, Justin; Albarracín, Dolores
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 104(6), Jun 2013, 1060-1076. doi: 10.1037/a0032282
We hypothesized that individuals may differ in the dispositional tendency to have positive vs. negative attitudes, a trait termed the dispositional attitude. Across 4 studies, we developed a 16-item Dispositional Attitude Measure (DAM) and investigated its internal consistency, test–retest reliability, factor structure, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. DAM scores were (a) positively correlated with positive affect traits, curiosity-related traits, and individual preexisting attitudes; (b) negatively correlated with negative affect traits; and (c) uncorrelated with theoretically unrelated traits. Dispositional attitudes also significantly predicted the valence of novel attitudes while controlling for theoretically relevant traits (such as the Big 5 and optimism). The dispositional attitude construct represents a new perspective in which attitudes are not simply a function of the properties of the stimuli under consideration, but are also a function of the properties of the evaluator. We discuss the intriguing implications of dispositional attitudes for many areas of research, including attitude formation, persuasion, and behavior prediction.
And this could be used in marketing! This is how it is done:
We all have that friend. The Debbie Downer who finds fault with sunshine and lollipops and sees a perpetually half empty glass. Well, it turns out being such a drag might be part of their individual personality—a dimension researchers are calling “dispositional attitude.”

A new study says people with a negative dispositional attitude will, as a rule, dislike things. All things. In other words, haters gonna hate.

Researchers created a scale that required people to report their attitudes towards things like architecture and camping. They found people with positive attitudes were generally open and curious, and tended to follow positive behaviors like recycling and driving carefully. The negative Nellies: not so much. The study is in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. [Justin Hepler and Dolores Albarracín, Attitudes without objects: Evidence for a dispositional attitude, its measurement, and its consequences]

Researchers say this personality trait could also be used for marketers—rather than convincing those with a negative dispositional attitude to like their product, they could just convince them to dislike everybody else’s.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=some-see-e...

 

Members (5)

 
 
 

Badge

Loading…

Birthdays

Birthdays Today

Birthdays Tomorrow

© 2017   Created by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service