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I have heard several times political leaders all over the world stressing the need for balancing growth and environmental issues. They say : "Development that hurts the environment is no development; but at the same time there is no justification for depriving people of development in the name of environment." Very balanced speech. But in practice they tilt more towards growth and forget all about the environment. This, I feel, is short-sightedness in its full splendour!

Ecological balance is "a state of dynamic equilibrium within a community of organisms in which genetic, species and ecosystem diversity remain relatively stable, subject to gradual changes through natural succession." The Earth and its ecology may act as co-ordinated systems in order to maintain the balance of nature. If it is not maintained properly and if we tilt it to suit us, we have to face severe consequences and destruction of the Natural world.

One of the most significant achievements of science over the past few decades has been to provide convincing evidence that human activity has had a growing and potentially unsustainable impact on virtually every aspect of our planet.The scientific community now needs to help society find a way out of this situation and on to a sustainable course of social and economic development that is compatible with the planet's natural systems and finite resources.

The warnings of catastrophe are still essential, particularly at a time when the minds of most politicians and their electorates in the world are focused on financial issues of more immediate concern. They need constant reminding from the scientists that the  consumerism has enhanced the environmental crisis.

The more evidence that scientists can gather to support this, and the better they outline the likely consequences of failure to change current trends, the higher the chances that politicians will adopt policies that are sustainable both economically and environmentally .


In the name of development, we remove trees and vegetation, change how we use land, and keep expanding paved areas. We use oil and other natural resources without any control. Increased population demand more developmental activities. But where do we get all that our greed demands from? From our planet that has limited ability to provide all that we ask for? From Nature?

Scientific indicators show that environmental change caused by human activities in recent times continues to rise — in some cases heading towards the point beyond which there may be no recovery.

Yes, exploiting natural resources in an unlimited manner brings revenue to the governments now. Expansion of industries bring employment opportunities to this generation. People will be happy with all the facilities provided by power generated by natural resources available at present.

But what about the future? If we consume everything Nature has to offer now itself how will the future generations  survive? Will you make your children, grand children,  great grand children and great, great grand children suffer because of your greed?! Will you allow them to go hungry and die at an young age without propagating? Will you make this planet of ours a hell for future generations to live in? Do you make them buy water, food and even air if at all they are available in clean states then?

 

Had our ancestors did this to us, do you think we would have survived this long? Think about it!

This article shows development and environment can go together without affecting one another adversely:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=us-acid-rain-regul...

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Replies to This Discussion

How climate is effecting the fall colours:

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2012/10/02/climate...

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=ecosystems-on-the-...

On Ecosystems:
Food webs are complex, but mathematical models can reveal critical links that, if disturbed, can cause the webs to flip to a different state, including collapse.
Once the flipping of food webs takes place, they are often unlikely to return to their original state.
Experiments in Peter Lake and Paul Lake near the Michigan-Wisconsin border are showing that models can predict a flip before it occurs, giving ecologists a chance to alter an ecosystem and pull it back from the brink.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=having-broken-co2-...

Having Broken CO2 Speed Limit, World Now "Stepping on the Gas"

The United Nations Environment Program warns that global emissions of greenhouse gases are opening up a widening gap between reality and climate change goals

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