SCI-ART LAB

Science, Art, Litt, Science based Art & Science Communication

Information

Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 22
Latest Activity: 10 hours ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

Don't try to grade intelligence, the effort will be an utter flop!

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 11 hours ago. 1 Reply

Q: Who is the most intelligent person in the world after Stephen Hawkins, and what are the best measurements for intelligence?Krishna: Hmmm!Who told you Hawkins occupy the first position in the list…Continue

Choking emergency : Heimlich maneuver

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday. 1 Reply

Choking emergency : Heimlich maneuverA step-by-step guide explaining what to do in a choking emergency.…Continue

Science isn't imperfect, we are!

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Sep 10. 1 Reply

Q: Is medical science imperfect?Krishna:I think science as a whole is not at all imperfect. Because science is perfect, the universe and its constituents are working wonderfully.What makes something…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them part 242

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Sep 10. 1 Reply

Q: How does a lighter produce fire?Krishna: The science behind the lighter is both simple and fascinating. To produce a flame, a lighter needs both fuel and a way to create a spark to ignite that…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Science Simplified! to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 10 hours ago

Do the northern lights make sounds that you can hear?

https://theconversation.com/do-the-northern-lights-make-sounds-that...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 10 hours ago

Mass extinction: A warning that this can happen now too

The end-Permian mass extinction event of roughly 252 million years ago—the worst such event in earth's history—has been linked to vast volcanic emissions of greenhouse gases, a major temperature increase, and the loss of almost every species in the oceans and on land.

Now, it seems that even the lakes and rivers were no safe havens. A recent study published by an international team of researchers  has identified a new cause of extinction during extreme warming events: toxic microbial blooms.

In a healthy ecosystem, microscopic algae and cyanobacteria provide oxygen to aquatic animals as a waste product of their photosynthesis. But when their numbers get out of control, these microbes deplete free oxygen, and even release toxins into the water. By studying the fossil, sediment, and chemical records of rocks near Sydney, Australia, the researchers discovered that several pulses of bloom events had occurred soon after the first volcanic rumblings of the end-Permian mass extinction. Once the bottom-feeder animals, or "detritivores," were killed off, there was no one left to keep the microbes in check. The fresh water systems then seethed with algae and bacteria, delaying the recovery of animals for perhaps millions of years.

We're seeing more and more toxic algae blooms in lakes and in shallow marine environments that's related to increases in temperature and changes in plant communities which are leading to increases in nutrient contributions to freshwater environments. So, a lot of parallels to today. The volcanism was a source of CO2 in the past but we know that the rate of CO2 input that was seen back then was similar to the rate of CO2 increases we're seeing today because of anthropogenic effects.

We can get a sense of how much climate has changed in the past, what the extremes are, how fast it can change, what the causes of climate change are and that gives us a nice backdrop for understanding what's happening today. The end-Permian is one of the best places to look for parallels with what's happening now.

The other big parallel is that the increase in temperature at the end of the Permian coincided with massive increases in forest fires. One of the things that that destroyed whole ecosystems was fire, and we're seeing that right now in several  places .

We should be concerned like hell!

Chris Mays et al, Lethal microbial blooms delayed freshwater ecosystem recovery following the end-Permian extinction, Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-25711-3

https://phys.org/news/2021-09-animals-died-toxic-soup-earth.html?ut...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 11 hours ago

How to make dormant seeds to germinate

Seeds that would otherwise lie dormant will spring to life with the aid of a new chemical discovered by researchers. 

Plants have the ability to perceive drought. When they do, they emit a hormone that helps them hold on to water. This same hormone, ABA, sends a message to seeds that it isn't a good time to germinate, leading to lower crop yields and less food in places where it's hot—an increasingly long list as a result of climate change.

"If you block ABA, you mess with the  that  use to prevent  germination. A new chemical, Antabactin, does exactly this. If we apply it,  dormant seeds will sprout.

Demonstrations of Antabactin's effectiveness are described in a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Aditya S. Vaidya et al, Click-to-lead design of a picomolar ABA receptor antagonist with potent activity in vivo, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2021). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2108281118

https://phys.org/news/2021-09-chemical-discovery-reluctant-seeds.ht...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 11 hours ago

How do cells acquire their shapes?

 A new mechanism that a simple yeast cell uses to acquire its shape has been identified recently by researchers. 

When  move or grow, they must add new membrane to those growth regions.

The process of membrane delivery is called exocytosis. Cells also must deliver this membrane to a specific location in order to maintain a sense of direction―called "polarization"―or grow in a coordinated manner.

Researchers have demonstrated that these processes are coupled: local excess of exocytosis causes some of the proteins attached to the membrane to move ('flow') away from the growth region. These proteins that move away mark the non-growing cell region, thus establishing a self-sustaining pattern, which gives rise to the tubular shape of these yeast cells. 

This is the first time that this mechanism for cell patterning―the process by which cells acquire spatial nonuniformities on their surfaces―has been identified.

 Cell patterning by secretion-induced plasma membrane flows, Science Advances (2021). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abg6718

https://phys.org/news/2021-09-cells-mechanism.html?utm_source=nwlet...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 11 hours ago

The microbial molecule that turns plants into zombies

A newly discovered manipulation mechanism used by parasitic bacteria to slow down plant aging, may offer new ways to protect disease-threatened food crops.

Parasites manipulate the organisms they live off to suit their needs, sometimes in drastic ways. When under the spell of a parasite, some plants undergo such extensive changes that they are described as "zombies". They stop reproducing and serve only as a habitat and host for the parasitic pathogens.

Until now, there's been little understanding of how this happens on a molecular and mechanistic level.

Research from the Hogenhout group at the John Innes Centre and collaborators published in Cell, has identified a manipulation molecule produced by Phytoplasma bacteria to hijack . When inside a plant, this  causes key growth regulators to be broken down, triggering abnormal growth.

Phytoplasma bacteria belong to a group of microbes that are notorious for their ability to reprogramme the development of their host plants. This group of bacteria are often responsible for the 'witches' brooms' seen in trees, where an excessive number of branches grow close together.

These bushy outgrowths are the result of the plant being stuck in a vegetative "zombie" state, unable to reproduce and therefore progress to a 'forever young' status. Phytoplasmas are a spectacular example of how the reach of genes can extend beyond the organisms to impact surrounding environments.

The new findings show how the bacterial protein  known as SAP05 manipulates plants by taking advantage of some of the host's own molecular machinery.

This machinery, called the proteasome, usually breaks down proteins that are no longer needed inside plant cells. SAP05 hijacks this process, causing plant proteins that are important in regulating growth and development, to effectively be thrown in a molecular recycling centre.

Without these proteins, the plant's development is reprogrammed to favour the bacteria, triggering the growth of multiple vegetative shoots and tissues and putting the pause on the plant ageing.

Parasitic modulation of host development by ubiquitin-independent protein degradation, Cell www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(21)01012-6DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2021.08.029

https://phys.org/news/2021-09-microbial-molecule-zombies.html?utm_s...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Ebola virus in survivors can trigger outbreaks years after infection

Ebola survivors can relapse and trigger outbreaks at least five years after infection, and long-term follow-up of former patients is needed to prevent devastating flare-ups, according to new research.

Scientists already knew Ebola could lie dormant in survivors, who test negative because the virus is in tissue rather than circulating in the blood.

But analysis of an outbreak this year in Guinea, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, found these "virus reservoirs" can awaken and cause new infections and transmission years on.

To trace the source of the Guinea outbreak, which involved 16 confirmed cases, 12 of whom died, researchers analysed the genomes of samples from several patients.

Ebola outbreaks are usually thought to result from the virus "spilling" from an animal host to a human.

But the analysis showed the Guinea strain was virtually identical to that from a 2013-16 wave.

If the virus had been circulating actively in the community since then, it would have accumulated a certain number of mutations as it spread.

Instead, the 2021 virus had just 12 changes, "far fewer than would be expected... during six years of sustained human-to-human transmission".

That strongly suggests the source was reactivated virus that had lain dormant in a survivor.

This is the longest known time between the declared end of an epidemic and a viral resurgence.

How and why dormant Ebola virus suddenly awakens and sickens a person remains something of a mystery, though there are some tantalising clues.

Sometimes a spike in Ebola antibodies can be detected in survivors at a given time -- a possible sign that the body is responding to a resurgent virus.

Around two-thirds of Ebola survivors have high antibody levels even five years after infection, but "the question to pose is what happens if there's a resurgence in the people whose immunity has dropped.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02378-w

source: Agence France-Presse

https://researchnews.cc/news/8930/Ebola-virus-in-survivors-can-trig...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

References

  1. 1.

    Xiao, X. et al. Sci. Rep. 11, 11898 (2021).

    PubMed Article Google Scholar 

  2. 2.

    Wang, L. F. & Eaton, B. T. Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 315, 325–344 (2007).

    PubMed Google Scholar 

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02519-1?utm_source=Natur...

part 4

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Many markets

If the virus did jump between animals and people on several occasions, the fact that lineages A and B are linked to people who visited different markets in Wuhan suggests that multiple individual animals, of one or more species, that were carrying a progenitor of SARS-CoV-2 could have been transported across Wuhan, infecting people in at least two locations.

A study published in June1 found that live animals susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, such as raccoon dogs and mink, were sold in numerous markets in Wuhan. Previous studies2 of the virus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) have concluded that it, too, probably jumped multiple times from animals to people.

The latest study, if verified, would mean that the scenario of a researcher accidentally being infected in a lab, and then spreading the virus to the population at large, would have had to happen twice, says Garry. It’s much more likely that the pandemic has its origins in the wildlife trade, he says.

To gather more evidence, the team behind the new analysis now plans to run computer simulations to test how well multiple spillovers would fit with the diversity of known SARS-CoV-2 genomes.

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-02519-1

part 3

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Fine-tooth comb

They analysed 1,716 SARS-CoV-2 genomes in a popular online genome repository called GISAID that were collected before 28 February 2020, and identified 38 such ‘intermediate’ genomes.

But when they looked at the sequences more closely, they found that many of these also contained mutations in other regions of their genomes. And they say that these mutations are definitively associated with either lineage A or lineage B — which discredits the idea that the corresponding viral genomes date to an intermediate stage of evolution between the two lineages.

The authors suggest that a laboratory or computer error probably occurred in sequencing one of the two mutations in these ‘intermediate’ genomes. “The more we dug, the more it looked like, maybe we can’t trust any of the ‘transitional’ genomes,” says study co-author Michael Worobey, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Such sequencing errors are not unusual, say researchers. Software can sometimes fill in gaps in the raw data with incorrect sequences, and viral samples can become contaminated, notes Richard Neher, a computational biologist at the University of Basel in Switzerland. “Such mishaps are not surprising,” he says. “Especially early in the pandemic, when protocols weren’t very established and people tried to generate data as fast as they could.”

Several researchers contacted by Nature, who sequenced some of the samples included in the study, say it is unlikely that their sequences include errors in the two key nucleotides.

But the study authors counter that even if some of the genomes were sequenced correctly, other parts of the same genomes, or the locations from which the samples were collected, still clearly indicate that they belong to only one or the other lineage.

“It is very unlikely” that any of the so-called intermediate genomes are actually transitional genomes, says study co-author

part2

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Did the coronavirus jump from animals to people twice?

 

Members (22)

 
 
 

Badge

Loading…

© 2021   Created by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service