SCI-ART LAB

Science, Art, Litt, Science based Art & Science Communication

Information

Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 21
Latest Activity: 4 hours ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

How to boost your WiFi performance

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago. 1 Reply

How to boost your WiFi performance when everyone's at homeTry these low- or no-cost tipsInternet speed is typically measured in Mbps—megabits per second. It includes two numbers: download speed (the…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them - part 226

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 7 hours ago. 1 Reply

Q: Why do players have shadows around them in all four directions while playing on the stadium?Krishna: There will be as many shadows as the number of light sources. People who play on playgrounds…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them - part 225

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday. 1 Reply

Q: What is time restricted eating and how is it helpful?Q: How is time restricted eating different from intermittent fasting?Krishna:  Intermittent fasting is the one where the fasting periods that…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them - part 224

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday. 1 Reply

Q: Can we take vaccines while taking blood thinners, some say we can and some say we can't. Which one is correct? Krishna: First click on this link and read the article.…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Science Simplified! to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

Purported phosphine on Venus more likely to be ordinary sulfur diox...

In September, a team led by astronomers in the United Kingdom announced that they had detected the chemical phosphine in the thick clouds of Venus. The team's reported detection, based on observations by two Earth-based radio telescopes, surprised many Venus experts. Earth's atmosphere contains small amounts of phosphine, which may be produced by life. Phosphine on Venus generated buzz that the planet, often succinctly touted as a "hellscape," could somehow harbor life within its acidic clouds.

--

Researchers realizing the limitless possibilities of wearable elect...

Benoît Lessard and his team are developing carbon-based technologies which could lead to improved flexible phone displays, make robotic skin more sensitive and allow for wearable electronics that could monitor the physical health of athletes in real-time.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action

The results of the Peoples' Climate Vote, the world's biggest ever survey of public opinion on climate change are published yesterday (27/1/2021). Covering 50 countries with over half of the world's population, the survey includes over half a million people under the age of 18, a key constituency on climate change that is typically unable to vote yet in regular elections. 

Results show that people often want broad climate policies beyond the current state of play. For example, in eight of the ten survey countries with the highest emissions from the power sector, majorities backed more renewable energy. In four out of the five countries with the highest emissions from land-use change and enough data on policy preferences, there was  for conserving forests and land. Nine out of ten of the countries with the most urbanized populations backed more use of clean electric cars and buses, or bicycles.

https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/news-centre/news/2021/Wor...

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-world-largest-opinion-survey-climate....

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time

Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter—and it's tighter than the science world thought.

The findings—due to be published in Physics Letters B in March—radically narrow the range of potential masses for Dark Matter particles, and help to focus the search for future Dark Matter-hunters. The  researchers used the established fact that gravity acts on Dark Matter just as it acts on the visible universe to work out the lower and upper limits of Dark Matter's mass.

The results show that Dark Matter cannot be either 'ultra-light' or 'super-heavy', as some have theorized, unless an as-yet undiscovered force also acts upon it.

The team used the assumption that the only force acting on Dark Matter is gravity, and calculated that Dark Matter particles must have a mass between 10-3 eV and 107 eV. That's a much tighter range than the 10-24 eV—1019 GeV spectrum which is generally theorized.

What makes the discovery even more significant is that if it turns out that the mass of Dark Matter is outside of the range predicted by the Sussex team, then it will also prove that an additional force—as well as gravity—acts on Dark Matter.

This is the first time that anyone has thought to use what we know about  as a way to calculate the mass range for Dark Matter.

 Xavier Calmet et al, Theoretical bounds on dark matter masses, Physics Letters B (2021). DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2021.136068

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-heavy-dark-scientists-radically-narro...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

Electronic Tattoo - Science of Innovation

Electronic transfer tattoo with a crease amplification effect

https://techxplore.com/news/2021-01-electronic-tattoo-crease-amplif...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

On nights before a full moon, people go to bed later and sleep less, study shows

New research indicates that our planet's celestial companion impacts something else entirely—our sleep.

Scientists report that sleep cycles in people oscillate during the 29.5-day : In the days leading up to a full moon, people go to sleep later in the evening and sleep for shorter periods of time. The research team, led by UW professor of biology Horacio de la Iglesia, observed these variations in both the time of sleep onset and the duration of sleep in urban and rural settings—from Indigenous communities in northern Argentina to college students in Seattle, a city of more than 750,000. They saw the oscillations regardless of an individual's access to electricity, though the variations are less pronounced in individuals living in urban environments.

The pattern's ubiquity may indicate that our natural circadian rhythms are somehow synchronized with—or entrained to—the phases of the lunar cycle. And although the effect is more robust in communities without access to electricity, the effect is present in communities with electricity.

How phases of the moon can affect your sleep

L. Casiraghi el al., "Moonstruck sleep: Synchronization of human sleep with the moon cycle under field conditions," Science Advances (2021). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abe0465

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-nights-full-moon-people-bed.html?utm_...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa 4 hours ago

Cell death shines a light on the origins of complex life

Organelles continue to thrive after the cells within which they exist die, a team of scientists have found, overturning previous assumptions that organelles decay too quickly to be fossilized.

Researchers from  were able to document the decay process of eukaryotic algal cells, showing that nuclei, chloroplasts and pyrenoids (organelles found within chloroplasts) can persist for weeks and months after cell death in eukaryote cells, long enough to be preserved as fossils.

The research found that organelles don't decay immediately after cell death, but actually take many weeks to dissolve. The results of these experiments shed light on the controversial fossils of early complex life that include structures within the cells.

The structures in Shuiyousphaeridium, a fossil from 1,700 million years ago, closely resemble nuclei. This interpretation has previously been dismissed because of the assumed rapid decay of nuclei. the new decay experiments have shown that nuclei can persist for several weeks, meaning the structures in Shuiyousphaeridium are likely to be nuclei.

By revealing the decay patterns of organelles, the study's authors say they can demonstrate the presence of complex life to 1,700 million years ago, helping to elucidate their evolutionary history with greater precision and clarity.

"Experimental taphonomy of organelles and the fossil record of early eukaryote evolution" Sciences Advancesadvances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abe9487

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-cell-death-complex-life.html?utm_sour...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Wearing 2 Masks Is 'Common Sense'. Here's How to Do It Properly

US health officials have long been advising people to wear a cloth mask with three layers of protection, or a surgical or N95 mask, to protect against the novel coronavirus.

But some people, including many at the inauguration, have been doubling up on masks - layering them to create an extra barrier of protection.

It's a good idea, according to experts.

 

"If you have a physical covering with one layer, you put another layer on, it just makes common sense that it likely would be more effective.

How to double-mask

The type of mask you double up on will affect the level of protection it provides.

As Business Insider's Anna Medaris Miller previously reported, it's a good idea to use a surgical mask or an N95 in your layering.

For example, it's better to use a double-layered cloth mask for the outside layer and a disposable surgical mask for the inside, rather than using two single-layered masks together.

The three layers each serve an individual purpose: the outside layer protects against splashes and droplets, the middle layer filters, and the bottom layer absorbs things like saliva and sweat.

Another way to double layer could be using a two-layered cloth mask with a face shield on top, though there is some evidence that masks may be more protective than shields.

Double layering doesn't mean you should let your guard down. Public health officials say the general public should still use social distancing practices, wash their hands regularly, and avoid gathering indoors.

https://www.sciencealert.com/fauci-says-wearing-2-masks-is-common-s...

https://www.businessinsider.in/science/news/fauci-said-it-is-common...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer

The colons of African Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer.

Scientists found that one side of the colon ages biologically faster than the other in both African Americans and people of European descent. In African Americans, however, the right side ages significantly faster, explaining why African Americans are more likely to develop cancerous lesions on the right side and why they are more likely to suffer colorectal cancer at a younger age, the researchers say.

The researchers made this determination by looking at the DNA in colon tissue, and the “epigenetic” changes that come with age. These epigenetic changes are not alterations to the genes, but changes that affect how the genes work and how well they can do their jobs.

The scientists found that the right side of the colon in most African Americans had suffered a unique pattern of “hypermethylation,” affecting gene expression. It was, in essence, like the right side was old beyond its years. This, the researchers believe, could contribute to African Americans’ increased cancer risk and could explain why they are more likely to develop cancerous lesions on the right side.

The research could also explain why younger people of European descent are more likely to develop lesions on the left side – the side that tends to age faster in that group.

These findings highlight the importance of colon sidedness to biology of colorectal cancer.

https://academic.oup.com/jnci/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/...

https://news.virginia.edu/content/strange-colon-discovery-explains-...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that human muscle has an innate ability to ward off the damaging effects of chronic inflammation when exercised. The discovery was made possible through the use of lab-grown, engineered human muscle, demonstrating the potential power of the first-of-its-kind platform in such research endeavors. The results appear online on January 22 in the journal Science Advances. 

--

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own

Exercising lab-grown human muscle autonomously blocks the damaging effects of interferon gamma

Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that human muscle has an innate ability to ward off damaging effects of chronic inflammation when exercised. The discovery was made possible through the use of lab-grown, engineered human muscle, demonstrating the potential power of the first-of-its-kind platform in such research endeavors.

Zhaowei Chen, Binjie Li, Ren-Zhi Zhan, Lingjun Rao, Nenad Bursac. Exercise Mimetics and JAK Inhibition Attenuate IFN-γ-induced Wasting in Engineered Human Skeletal MuscleScience Advances, 2021 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.eabd9502

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210122140624.htm

https://researchnews.cc/news/4805/Exercising-muscle-combats-chronic...

--

Technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mu...

Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities. However, an innovative breakthrough developed by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Physics promises to diagnose DNA rearrangement mutations at a fraction of the cost with improved accuracy.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday

Physicists discover new physical effect

Scientists have found that a perpendicular magnetic field makes electrically neutral quasiparticles (excitons) in semiconductors behave like electrons in the Hall effect. This discovery will help researchers to study the physics of excitons and Bose-Einstein condensates.

The Hall effect can be achieved by applying a magnetic field in a direction perpendicular to the current flow of a semiconductor or a metal plate. In this case, all the electrons will deflect to one side, which will accumulate a , while the other side has a . This results in voltage between the right and left end faces of the plate.

physicists have recently discovered a similar effect but for excitons, composite neutral quasiparticles. It occurs when a laser affects a semiconductor plate of gallium arsenide, for example, in the presence of a magnetic field. The new phenomenon was called the anomalous  Hall effect.

"If you take a thin stripe of a semiconductor material and put it under a  at the right angle, you'll create a directed flow of exciton gas. By applying a perpendicular  to this film, you will make the exciton cloud deflect to one side. And this is a complete analog of the Hall effect—but for neutrally charged composite quasiparticles.

This effect will help researchers separate bright and dark excitons. When exciton gas is formed, some excitons are able to emit light once the electron returns to its place. Such quasiparticles are called bright excitons. Other excitons disappear without light emission—these are dark excitons. Although it is especially difficult to study and obtain them because both types of quasiparticles are created simultaneously, the proposed method for separating bright excitons from dark ones will successfully resolve this issue.the discovered effect is unlikely to be as widely applied Hall effect technologies used in smartphones, but it may be highly valuable for scientists who study excitons. In particular, it will greatly simplify the study of such mind-blowing and complex states of matter as Bose-Einstein condensates.

 V. K. Kozin et al. Anomalous Exciton Hall Effect, Physical Review Letters (2021). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.126.036801

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-physicists-physical-effect.html?utm_s...

 

Members (21)

 
 
 

Badge

Loading…

Birthdays

© 2021   Created by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service