SCI-ART LAB

Science, Art, Litt, Science based Art & Science Communication

Information

Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 21
Latest Activity: 6 minutes ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

Important research news in medical sciences

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday. 0 Replies

Ph.D. Founder, Science Communication Network at Sci-Art Lab (2008–present)…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them - part 211

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Monday. 1 Reply

Q: Are scientists and geologists obliged to accept the climate change theories? Who are some famous scientific people who don't believe in climate change?…Continue

Qs people asked me on science and my replies to them - part 210

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Saturday. 1 Reply

Q: In recent times people are trying to malign scientists and your efforts to educate people about pseudo-science by saying 'scientists put a few things they don't understand under the heading…Continue

Reason for dissociative experiences

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Sep 17. 1 Reply

Research team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences People sometimes lose themselves in a great book or a daydream. But it's disconcerting when feeling transported becomes so…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Science Simplified! to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 18, 2020 at 5:46am

https://www.sciencealert.com/teen-in-ohio-blasts-away-retina-by-sta...

Teen 'Blasts Away' Parts of Retina by Staring Into a Pet's Laser Pointer

--

Regrowing knee cartilage: new animal studies show promise  

--
Reviving non-beating donor heart for successful transplantation:

Doctors performed heart transplant surgery from a donor after circulatory death, or DCD, using a new portable organ care system. The successful surgery is part of a US national interventional clinical trial that could increase organ donation by an estimated 20-30 percent, resulting in less waiting time for patients in need of a new heart.

https://researchnews.cc/news/2550/UC-San-Diego-Health-revives-non-b...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 6:26am

The Big Picture 

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 6:18am

Synthetic clothing fibers contribute vast amounts of plastic pollution on land

176,500 metric tons of synthetic microfibers—chiefly polyester and nylon—are released every year onto terrestrial environments across the globe, according to a new study. The microfibers are shed from clothing during washing, and the amount ending up on land now exceeds the amount that enters waterbodies.

Plastic pollution in the ocean has received lots of attention in recent years, but waterways are not the only place that plastic accumulates. Fourteen percent of all plastic is used to make synthetic fibers, chiefly for clothing. Microfibers, defined as particles less than 5 millimeters in length, are generated in large quantities at every stage of a fiber's life cycle, especially during washing, which mechanically fragments synthetic fibers. When wash water becomes part of the flow to a  plant, the microfibers it contains may be retained along with biosolid sludge, which may be applied to cropland or buried in landfills.

Gavigan J, Kefela T, Macadam-Somer I, Suh S, Geyer R (2020) Synthetic microfiber emissions to land rival those to waterbodies and are growing. PLoS ONE 15(9): e0237839. doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0237839

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-synthetic-fibers-contribute-vast-amou...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 6:14am

Molecular 'dances' determine how liquids take up heat

Scientists have uncovered a link between the microscopic movements of particles in a liquid and its ability to absorb heat.

When a liquid is heated the molecules within it start to move about and jump around. As the temperature increases, particles begin to move more frequently and cover increasingly larger distances. Together, these motions create different patterns of molecular "dances," known as collective excitations.

Researchers now found that the collective excitations observed in liquids can eventually become so intense that they start to interact with each other, changing the way the liquid itself takes up heat.

The 

findings in many different types of liquids and found that this relationship was universal across liquids.

The discovery of this new relationship bridges the gap between the microscopic behavior of liquids and their key macroscopic property—heat capacity. It also suggests that there is an optimal temperature region for cooling applications and it is possible to control this region by tuning the pattern of molecular "dances."

Nikita P. Kryuchkov et al. Universal Effect of Excitation Dispersion on the Heat Capacity and Gapped States in Fluids, Physical Review Letters (2020). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.125.125501

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-molecular-liquids.html?utm_source=nwl...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 6:08am

Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-anti-reflective-coating-eyes.html?utm...

--

Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-hospital-germs-strongly-surfaces.html...

https://www.quora.com/q/sciencecommunication/More-research-news-Bio...;  - check%%

--

Astronomers discover a 2-km asteroid orbiting closer to the sun than Venus

Ip et al., A kilometer-scale asteroid inside Venus's orbit. arXiv:2009.04125 [astro-ph.EP]. arxiv.org/abs/2009.04125

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-astronomers-km-asteroid-orbiting-clos...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 5:58am

Discovery of a new mass extinction

It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record. In a new paper, published today in Science Advances, an international team has identified a major extinction of life 233 million years ago that triggered the dinosaur takeover of the world. The crisis has been called the Carnian Pluvial Episode.

The cause was most likely massive volcanic eruptions in the Wrangellia Province of western Canada, where huge volumes of volcanic basalt was poured out and forms much of the western coast of North America.

"Extinction and dawn of the modern world in the Carnian (Late Triassic)" Science Advances (2020). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.aba0099

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-discovery-mass-extinction.html?utm_so...

--

World fails to meet a single target to stop destruction of nature – UN report

The world has failed to meet a single target to stem the destruction of wildlife and life-sustaining ecosystems in the last decade, according to a devastating new report from the UN on the state of nature.

https://www.cbd.int/gbo5

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/15/every-global-ta...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 5:49am

Native stinging tree toxins match the pain of spiders and scorpions

The painful toxins wielded by a giant  stinging tree are surprisingly similar to the venom found in spiders and cone snails researchers have found.

The Gympie-Gympie stinging tree is one of the world's most venomous plants and causes extreme long-lasting pain. Researchers found a new family of toxins, which they've named 'gympietides' after the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree.

The tree's scientific name is Dendrocnide which literally means 'stinging tree'—a member of the nettle family. Like other stinging plants such as nettles, the giant stinging tree is covered in needle-like appendages called trichomes that are around five millimetres in length—the trichomes look like fine hairs, but actually act like hypodermic needles that inject toxins when they make contact with skin.

 Small molecules in the trichomes such as histamine, acetylcholine and formic acid have been tested but injecting these does not cause the severe and long-lasting pain of the stinging tree, suggesting that there was an unidentified neurotoxin to be found.

Although they come from a plant, the gympietides are similar to spider and cone snail toxins in the way they fold into their 3-D molecular structures and target the same pain receptors—this arguably makes the Gympie-Gympie tree a truly "venomous" plant. The long-lasting pain from the stinging tree may be explained by the gympietides permanently changing the sodium channels in the sensory neurons, not due to the fine hairs getting stuck in the skin.

By understanding how this toxin works, scientists hope to provide better treatment to those who have been stung by the plant, to ease or eliminate the pain.

With these toxins from both plants and animals having a shared method of causing pain, it begs the question, when and how did these toxins evolve?

The researchers point to two possibilities for the toxin's evolution from either an ancestral gene in an ancient shared ancestor or convergent evolution, where nature re-invents the most fitting structure to fit a common purpose.

E.K. Gilding el al., "Neurotoxic peptides from the venom of the giant Australian stinging tree," Science Advances (2020). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abb8828

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-native-tree-toxins-pain-spiders.html?...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 5:38am

How Dantu Blood Group protects against malaria—and how all humans could benefit

In 2017, researchers discovered that the rare Dantu blood variant, which is found regularly only in parts of East Africa, provides some degree of protection against severe malaria.

The secret of how the Dantu genetic blood variant helps to protect against malaria has been revealed for the first time by scientists now. They found that red blood cells in people with the rare Dantu blood variant have a higher surface tension that prevents them from being invaded by the world's deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

Analysis of the characteristics of the red blood cell samples indicated that the Dantu variant created cells with a higher surface tension—like a drum with a tighter skin. At a certain tension, malaria parasites were no longer able to enter the cell, halting their lifecycle and preventing their ability to multiply in the blood. The Dantu blood group has a novel 'chimeric' protein that is expressed on the surface of red blood cells, and alters the balance of other surface proteins.

This finding could also be significant in the wider battle against malaria. Because the surface tension of human red blood  cells increases as they age, it may be possible to design drugs that imitate this natural process to prevent malaria infection or reduce its severity.

Red blood cell tension protects against severe malaria in the Dantu blood group, Nature (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2726-6 , www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2726-6

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-09-dantu-blood-group-malariaand...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 17, 2020 at 5:12am

A new strategy for the viral manipulation of interneurons in mice and other mammals

the use of viral vectors that were developed by identifying short sequences of DNA restricting the expression of a virus onto the desired target cell type.

Viral manipulation of functionally distinct interneurons in mice, non-human primates and humans. Nature Neuroscience (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41593-020-0692-9.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-09-strategy-viral-interneurons-...

--

Harnessing DNA molecules for disease detection and electronics

DNA molecules express heredity through genetic information. However, in the past few years, scientists have discovered that DNA can conduct electrical currents. This makes it an interesting candidate for roles that nature did not intend for this molecule, such as smaller, faster and cheaper electric circuits in electronic devices, and to detect the early stages of diseases like cancer and COVID-19.

The  most surprising recent finding was that the current passes through the DNA backbone, contrary to prior assumptions in the scientific community that the current flowed along DNA base pairs. 

 Roman Zhuravel et al. Backbone charge transport in double-stranded DNA, Nature Nanotechnology (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41565-020-0741-2

https://phys.org/news/2020-09-harnessing-dna-molecules-disease-elec...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on September 16, 2020 at 9:20am

Keeping MAX quiet with Chevrons.

 

Members (21)

 
 
 

Badge

Loading…

© 2020   Created by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service