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Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 21
Latest Activity: 6 minutes ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

The science of underwater swimming: how staying submerged gives Olympians the winning edge

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa yesterday. 1 Reply

To win swimming gold in Tokyo, swimmers not only have to generate incredible power with their arms and legs to propel themselves through the water; they also have to overcome the relentless pull of…Continue

Debate between scientists and people who practice pseudo-science - Part 2

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Jul 15. 3 Replies

                                        Interactive science series: 15 :Why Astrology is pseudo-science                                                                                         and    …Continue

Qs people asked about science and my replies to them -Part 238

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Jul 10. 3 Replies

Q: Why were Albert Einstein, Galileo, Newton, Nicola Tesla, and other great scientists born only in Europe? Why did no Indian scientist illuminate his name?Krishna: Didn’t hear about*CV Raman (of…Continue

Nanomaterials shape and form influences their ability to cross the blood brain barrier

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Jul 7. 1 Reply

Nanomaterials shape and form influences their ability to cross the blood brain barrierNanomaterials found in consumer and health-care products can pass from the bloodstream to the brain side of a…Continue

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Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Thursday

Rounding errors could make certain stopwatches pick wrong race winners

As the Summer Olympics draw near, the world will shift its focus to photo finishes and races determined by mere fractions of a second. Obtaining such split-second measurements relies on faultlessly rounding a raw time recorded by a stopwatch or electronic timing system to a submitted time.

Researchers now found certain stopwatches commit rounding errors when converting raw times to final submitted times. They outline a series of computer simulations based on procedures for converting raw race times for display.

These researchers were inspired when they encountered the issue firsthand while volunteering at a swim meet. While helping input times into the computer, they noticed a large portion of times they inputted were rounded to either the closest half-second or full second.

Later, when the frequencies of the digit pairs were plotted, a distinct pattern emerged. They discovered that the distribution of digit pairs was statistically inconsistent with the hypothesis that each digit pair was equally likely, as one would expect from stopwatches.

Stopwatches and electronic timing systems use quartz oscillators to measure time intervals, with each oscillation calculated as 0.0001 seconds. These times are then processed for display to 0.01 seconds, for example, to the public at a sporting venue.

When the researchers  processed raw times through the standard display routine, the uniform distribution disappeared. Most times were correctly displayed.

Where rounding errors occurred, they usually resulted in changes of one one-hundredth of a second. One raw time of 28.3194 was converted to a displayed time of 28.21.

The researchers collected more than 30,000 race times from swimming competitions and will investigate if anomalous timing patterns appear in the collection, which would suggest the potential for rounding errors in major sporting events.

David A. Faux et al, The floating point: Rounding error in timing devices, American Journal of Physics (2021). DOI: 10.1119/10.0003919

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-rounding-errors-stopwatches-wrong-win...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Thursday

Study finds calcium precisely directs blood flow in the brain

Unlike the rest of the body, there is not enough real estate in the brain for stored energy. Instead, the brain relies on the hundreds of miles of blood vessels within it to supply fresh energy via the blood. Yet, how the brain expresses a need for more energy during increased activity and then directs its blood supply to specific hot spots was, until now, poorly understood.

Now,  researchers have shown how the brain communicates to blood vessels when in need of energy, and how these blood vessels respond by relaxing or constricting to direct blood flow to specific brain regions.

If the brain does not get blood to where it needs it when it needs it, the neurons become stressed, and over time they deteriorate ultimately leading to cognitive decline and memory problems.

Large arteries feed medium-sized vessels known as arterioles that then feed even tinier capillaries—so small that only a single blood cell can pass through at once. In a 2017 Nature Neuroscience paper, the researchers showed that electrical pulses coursing through the capillaries direct blood flow from the medium-sized arterioles supplying large regions of the brain. For this latest paper, the team studied the fine-tuning of blood as it flows through the capillaries to precisely regulate energy supply to tiny regions in the brain.

There seem to be two mechanisms working in tandem to ensure that energy in the form of blood makes it to specific regions of the brain: one broad and the other precise. The first electrical mechanism is like a crude sledgehammer approach to get more blood to the general vicinity of the increased brain activity by controlling the medium-sized arterioles, and then capillary calcium signals ensure exquisite fine-tuning to make sure the blood gets to exactly the right place at the right time through the tiny capillaries.

"Local IP3 receptor–mediated Ca2+ signals compound to direct blood flow in brain capillaries" Science Advances (2021). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abh0101

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-calcium-precisely-blood-brai...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Thursday

Microbially produced fibers: Stronger than steel, tougher than Kevlar

Spider silk is said to be one of the strongest, toughest materials on the Earth. Now engineers  have designed amyloid silk hybrid proteins and produced them in engineered bacteria. The resulting fibers are stronger and tougher than some natural spider silks.

The artificial silk—dubbed "polymeric amyloid" fiber—was not technically produced by researchers, but by bacteria that were genetically engineered in the lab.

Jingyao Li et al, Microbially Synthesized Polymeric Amyloid Fiber Promotes β-Nanocrystal Formation and Displays Gigapascal Tensile Strength, ACS Nano (2021). DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c02944

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-microbially-fibers-stronger-steel-tou...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

Quantum Computers, Explained With Quantum Physics

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

The Standard Model

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

Scientists create world's thinnest magnet

The development of an ultrathin magnet that operates at room temperature could lead to new applications in computing and electronics—such as high-density, compact spintronic memory devices—and new tools for the study of quantum physics.

The ultrathin magnet, which was recently reported in the journal Nature Communications , could make big advances in next-gen memories, computing, spintronics, and quantum physics.

This discovery is exciting because it not only makes 2-D magnetismpossible at room temperature, but it also uncovers a new mechanism to realize 2-D magnetic materials.

zinc oxide's free electrons could act as an intermediary that ensures the magnetic cobalt atoms in the new 2-D device continue pointing in the same direction—and thus stay magnetic—even when the host, in this case the semiconductor zinc oxide, is a nonmagnetic material.

Rui Chen et al, Tunable room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co-doped two-dimensional van der Waals ZnO, Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-24247-w

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-scientists-world-thinnest-magnet.html...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday
Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

No more broken mobile screens: Bengal researchers develop self-healing material

The research on the material, that scientists said can repair themselves within milliseconds when fractured, has made it to the coveted Science journal.
A group of researchers from the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata and Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, developed a new class of materials that they claim can repair themselves when fractured, within milliseconds.

The research has also made it to the coveted Science journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The scientists claimed that the highly crystalline materials, when broken into pieces, can self-heal and re-join in a matter of a second, and repair themselves so precisely that they become indistinguishable from the undisturbed materials.

The scientists hope that the discovery can spark a revolution in the field of digital technology, such as broken screens of gadgets and other new-age technologies.

The researchers said materials applied in technologies undergo mechanical impacts which often make the devices irreparable. The idea prompted the team to delve deep in search of self-repairing materials to enhance the longevity of the devices without external intervention.

Researchers developed a new class of solid materials that with a head-to-tail (positive end-to-negative end) polar arrangement in the crystalline state generates opposite electrical potentials at the fractured surfaces. These charges allow instant recombination and self-repair of the broken crystals without any external help. The scientists said that during the repair, fractured pieces travel with a honeybee wing-like motion with acceleration comparable to diesel cars.

Another team from IISER  used a custom-designed state-of-the-art polarisation microscopic system to probe and quantify the structural order of the piezoelectric self-healing organic crystals with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

The scientists said that these crystals, which belong to a general class of piezoelectric materials, can generate electricity under pressure, which in turn can heal and retain their crystalline nature which is important for many applications.

**

https://www.hindustantimes.com/science/no-more-broken-mobile-screen...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

NASA Lucy mission's message to the future

In the 1970s four spacecraft began their one-way trips out of our Solar System. As the first human-built objects to ever venture into interstellar space, NASA chose to place plaques on Pioneer 10 and 11 and golden records on Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft to serve as messages to any alien spacefarers that may someday encounter these spacecraft. Continuing this legacy, NASA's Lucy spacecraft will carry a similar plaque. However, because Lucy will not be venturing outside of our Solar System, Lucy's plaque is a time-capsule featuring messages to our descendants.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

SCI-COM: 

An exciting career pathway for connecting Science to the Masses

CSIR‐NISCAIR offers doctoral degree and post graduate courses in Science & Technology Communication

http://niscair.res.in/researchandeducation/acsir

 

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