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Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 21
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

Proning

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 10. 0 Replies

Q: What is proning?Krishna: If you feel breathless during covid, as some patients experience mild respiratory distress who do not need a ventilator, or those who could progress to severe respiratory…Continue

Sci-Com Videos

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 10. 1 Reply

Science Today: Communicating ScienceHow to explain scientific ideas: 6 SIMPLE tips from a communication expertContinue

Qs people asked about science and my replies to them -Part 235

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 9. 1 Reply

Q: What are the differences and similarities of a polymath and an autodidact?Krishna: A polymath is a person of wide knowledge or learning. S/he is also a person whose expertise spans a significant…Continue

Effects of pregnant women smoking and drinking on their fetuses

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 1. 2 Replies

                                     Ladies and gentlemen say 'no' to this toxic empowerment. We had a discussion on reforms recently. During the process some people expressed the opinion that  women…Continue

Comment Wall

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You need to be a member of Science Simplified! to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Thursday

Water and quantum magnets share critical physics

In physics, things exist in phases, such as solid, liquid and gas states. When something crosses from one phase to another, we talk about a phase transition—like water boiling into steam, turning from liquid to gas.

Water boils at 100 degrees C, and its density changes dramatically, making a discontinuous jump from liquid to gas. However, if we turn up the pressure, the boiling point of water also increases, until a pressure of 221 atmospheres where it boils at 374 degrees C. Here, something strange happens: the liquid and gas merge into a single phase. Above this "critical point," there is no longer a phase transition at all, and so by controlling its pressure, water can be steered from liquid to gas without ever crossing one.

Is there a quantum version of a water-like phase transition? The current directions in quantum magnetism and spintronics require highly spin-anisotropic interactions to produce the physics of topological phases and protected qubits, but these interactions also favor discontinuous quantum phase transitions.

Previous studies have focused on smooth, continuous phase transitions in quantum . Now researchers have studied a discontinuous phase transition to observe the first ever critical point in a quantum magnet, similar to that of water. The work is now published in Nature.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

Wildfires launch microbes into the air. How big of a health risk is that?

Now that they know bacteria and fungi can survive in wildfire smoke, a small group of researchers is trying to figure out the implications

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/wildfire-smoke-microbes-air-hea...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

Superbug killer: New nanotech destroys bacteria and fungal cells

Researchers have developed a new superbug-destroying coating that could be used on wound dressings and implants to prevent and treat potentially deadly bacterial and fungal infections.

The material is one of the thinnest antimicrobial coatings developed to date and is effective against a broad range of drug-resistant bacteria and fungal cells, while leaving human cells unharmed.

The new coating from a team led by RMIT University is based on an ultra-thin 2D material that until now has mainly been of interest for next-generation electronics.

Studies on black phosphorus (BP) have indicated it has some antibacterial and antifungal properties, but the material has never been methodically examined for potential clinical use.

The new research, published in the American Chemical Society's journal Applied Materials & Interfaces, reveals that BP is effective at killing microbes when spread in nanothin layers on surfaces like titanium and cotton, used to make implants and wound dressings.

Broad-spectrum solvent-free layered black phosphorus as a rapid action antimicrobial, ACS Applied Materials & InterfacesDOI: 10.1021/acsami.1c01739.

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-superbug-killer-nanotech-bacteria-fun...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Wednesday

In a first, scientists watch 2D puddles of electrons spontaneously emerge in a 3D superconducting material

Creating a two-dimensional material, just a few atoms thick, is often an arduous process requiring sophisticated equipment. So scientists were surprised to see 2D puddles emerge inside a three-dimensional superconductor—a material that allows electrons to travel with 100% efficiency and zero resistance—with no prompting.

Within those puddles, superconducting electrons acted as if they were confined inside an incredibly thin, sheet-like plane, a situation that requires them to somehow cross over to another dimension, where different rules of quantum physics apply.

"This is a tantalizing example of emergent behavior, which is often difficult or impossible to replicate by trying to engineer it from scratch.

It's as if when given the power to superconduct,  the 3D electrons choose for themselves to live in a 2D world.

The research team calls this new phenomenon "inter-dimensional superconductivity,"  in a report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

This is how 3D  reorganize themselves just before undergoing an abrupt shift into an insulating state, where electrons are confined to their home atoms and can't move around at all.

Carolina Parra el al., "Signatures of two-dimensional superconductivity emerging within a three-dimensional host superconductor," PNAS (2021). www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.2017810118

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-scientists-2d-puddles-electrons-spont...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

Scientists Create the Next Generation of Living Robots

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

Upward lightning takes its cue from nearby lightning events

In the chaos of a thunderstorm, upward moving lightning occasionally springs from the tops of tall structures. Scientists don't fully understand how upward lightning is triggered; it is likely a combination of multiple environmental factors, such as the background electric field and the structure's height. In a new study, Sunjerga et al. investigate how ambient lightning events near tall structures may trigger upward lightning.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

Researchers discover new way to starve brain tumors

Scientists have found a new way to starve cancerous brain tumor cells of energy in order to prevent further growth.

Medulloblastoma is the most common high-grade brain tumor in children. Survival rate is 70 percent for those whose tumor has not spread but it is almost always fatal in cases of recurrent tumor.

The research, published in the high impact journal Nature Communications, looks at inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a naturally occurring compound present in almost all plants and animals, and showed how it inhibits medulloblastoma and can be combined with chemotherapy to kill .

Inositol treatment inhibits medulloblastoma through suppression of epigenetic-driven metabolic adaptation, Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-22379-7

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-04-starve-brain-tumors.html?utm...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

Scientists discover three liquid phases in aerosol particles

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have discovered three liquid phases in aerosol particles, changing our understanding of air pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere.

While  were known to contain up to two liquid phases, the discovery of an additional  may be important to providing more accurate atmospheric models and . The study was published today in PNAS.

Jeffrey S. Kwang el al., "The role of lateral erosion in the evolution of nondendritic drainage networks to dendricity and the persistence of dynamic networks," PNAS (2021). www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.2102512118

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-scientists-liquid-phases-aerosol-part...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Tuesday

'Tantalizing' results of 2 experiments defy physics rulebook

Preliminary results from two experiments suggest something could be wrong with the basic way physicists think the universe works, a prospect that has the field of particle physics both baffled and thrilled.

Tiny particles called muons aren't quite doing what is expected of them in two different long-running experiments. The confounding results—if proven right—reveal major problems with the rulebook physicists use to describe and understand how the universe works at the subatomic level.

The rulebook, called the Standard Model, was developed about 50 years ago. Experiments performed over decades affirmed over and again that its descriptions of the particles and the forces that make up and govern the universe were pretty much on the mark. Until now.

Now it 's observed that the muons' magnetic fields don't seem to be what the Standard Model says they should be. If confirmed, the results would be the biggest finding in the bizarre world of subatomic particles in nearly 10 years.

The secrets don't just live in matter. They live in something that seems to fill in all of space and time. These are quantum fields.

--

The results involve the strange, fleeting particle called the muon. The muon is the heavier cousin to the electron that orbits an atom's center. But the muon is not part of the atom, it is unstable and normally exists for only two microseconds. 

Preliminary results suggest that the magnetic "spin" of the muons is 0.1% off what the Standard Model predicts. That may not sound like much, but to particle physicists it is huge—more than enough to upend current understanding.

The observations and the experiment  are not being called an official discovery yet because there is still a tiny chance that the results are statistical quirks.

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-tantalizing-results-defy-physics-rule...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on Monday

Less is more: Why our brains struggle to subtract

Pager, a nine year old Macaque, plays MindPong with his Neuralink.

Field Study Sheds New Light on Melt Zone
 

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