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Science Simplified!

                       JAI VIGNAN

All about Science - to remove misconceptions and encourage scientific temper

Communicating science to the common people

'To make  them see the world differently through the beautiful lense of  science'

Members: 21
Latest Activity: 11 hours ago

         WE LOVE SCIENCE HERE BECAUSE IT IS A MANY SPLENDOURED THING

     THIS  IS A WAR ZONE WHERE SCIENCE FIGHTS WITH NONSENSE AND WINS                                               

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.”             

                    "Being a scientist is a state of mind, not a profession!"

"Knowledge is a Superpower but the irony is you cannot get enough of it with ever increasing data base unless you try to keep up with it constantly and in the right way!" The best education comes from learning from people who know what they are exactly talking about.

Science is this glorious adventure into the unknown, the opportunity to discover things that nobody knew before. And that’s just an experience that’s not to be missed. But it’s also a motivated effort to try to help humankind. And maybe that’s just by increasing human knowledge—because that’s a way to make us a nobler species.

If you are scientifically literate the world looks very different to you.

We do science and science communication not because they are easy but because they are difficult!

There are about 573 articles posted here. Links to some important articles :

1. Interactive science series...

a. how-to-do-research-and-write-research-papers-part 13

b. Some Qs peopel asked me on science and my replies to them...

Part 6part-10part-11part-12, part 14  ,  part- 8

part- 1part-2part-4part-5part-16part-17part-18 , part-19 , part-20

part-21 , part-22part-23part-24part-25part-26part-27 , part-28

part-29part-30part-31part-32part-33part-34part-35part-36part-37,

 part-38part-40part-41part-42part-43part-44part-45part-46part-47

Part 48 part49Critical thinking -part 50 , part -51part-52part-53

part-54part-55part-57part-58part-59part-60part-61part-62part-63

part 64, part-65part-66part-67part-68part 69part-70 part-71part-73 ...

.......185

BP variations during pregnancy part-72

who is responsible for the gender of  thier children - a man or a woman -part-56

c. some-questions-people-asked-me-on-science-based-on-my-art-and-poems -part-7

d. science-s-rules-are-unyielding-they-will-not-be-bent-for-anybody-part-3-

e. debate-between-scientists-and-people-who-practice-and-propagate-pseudo-science - part -9

f. why astrology is pseudo-science part 15

g. How Science is demolishing patriarchal ideas - part-39

2. in-defence-of-mangalyaan-why-even-developing-countries-like-india need space research programmes

3. Science communication series:

a. science-communication - part 1

b. how-scienitsts-should-communicate-with-laymen - part 2

c. main-challenges-of-science-communication-and-how-to-overcome-them - part 3

d. the-importance-of-science-communication-through-art- part 4

e. why-science-communication-is-geting worse - part  5

f. why-science-journalism-is-not-taken-seriously-in-this-part-of-the-world - part 6

g. blogs-the-best-bet-to-communicate-science-by-scientists- part 7

h. why-it-is-difficult-for-scientists-to-debate-controversial-issues - part 8

i. science-writers-and-communicators-where-are-you - part 9

j. shooting-the-messengers-for-a-different-reason-for-conveying-the- part 10

k. why-is-science-journalism-different-from-other-forms-of-journalism - part 11

l.  golden-rules-of-science-communication- Part 12

m. science-writers-should-develop-a-broader-view-to-put-things-in-th - part 13

n. an-informed-patient-is-the-most-cooperative-one -part 14

o. the-risks-scientists-will-have-to-face-while-communicating-science - part 15

p. the-most-difficult-part-of-science-communication - part 16

q. clarity-on-who-you-are-writing-for-is-important-before-sitting-to write a science story - part 17

r. science-communicators-get-thick-skinned-to-communicate-science-without-any-bias - part 18

s. is-post-truth-another-name-for-science-communication-failure?

t. why-is-it-difficult-for-scientists-to-have-high-eqs

u. art-and-literature-as-effective-aids-in-science-communication-and teaching

v.* some-qs-people-asked-me-on-science communication-and-my-replies-to-them

 ** qs-people-asked-me-on-science-and-my-replies-to-them-part-173

w. why-motivated-perception-influences-your-understanding-of-science

x. science-communication-in-uncertain-times

y. sci-com: why-keep-a-dog-and-bark-yourself

z. How to deal with sci com dilemmas?

4. Health related topics:

a. why-antibiotic-resistance-is-increasing-and-how-scientists-are-tr

b. what-might-happen-when-you-take-lots-of-medicines

c. know-your-cesarean-facts-ladies

d. right-facts-about-menstruation

e. answer-to-the-question-why-on-big-c

f. how-scientists-are-identifying-new-preventive-measures-and-cures-

g. what-if-little-creatures-high-jack-your-brain-and-try-to-control-

h. who-knows-better?

i. mycotoxicoses

j. immunotherapy

k. can-rust-from-old-drinking-water-pipes-cause-health-problems

l. pvc-and-cpvc-pipes-should-not-be-used-for-drinking-water-supply

m. melioidosis

n.vaccine-woes

o. desensitization-and-transplant-success-story

p. do-you-think-the-medicines-you-are-taking-are-perfectly-alright-then revisit your position!

q. swine-flu-the-difficlulties-we-still-face-while-tackling-the-outb

r. dump-this-useless-information-into-a-garbage-bin-if-you-really-care about evidence based medicine

s. don-t-ignore-these-head-injuries

t. the-detoxification-scam

u. allergic- agony-caused-by-caterpillars-and-moths

General science: 

a.why-do-water-bodies-suddenly-change-colour

b. don-t-knock-down-your-own-life-line

c. the-most-menacing-animal-in-the-world

d. how-exo-planets-are-detected

e. the-importance-of-earth-s-magnetic-field

f. saving-tigers-from-extinction-is-still-a-travail

g. the-importance-of-snakes-in-our-eco-systems

h. understanding-reverse-osmosis

i. the-importance-of-microbiomes

j. crispr-cas9-gene-editing-technique-a-boon-to-fixing-defective-gen

k. biomimicry-a-solution-to-some-of-our-problems

5. the-dilemmas-scientists-face

6. why-we-get-contradictory-reports-in-science

7. be-alert-pseudo-science-and-anti-science-are-on-prowl

8. science-will-answer-your-questions-and-solve-your-problems

9. how-science-debunks-baseless-beliefs

10. climate-science-and-its-relevance

11. the-road-to-a-healthy-life

12. relative-truth-about-gm-crops-and-foods

13. intuition-based-work-is-bad-science

14. how-science-explains-near-death-experiences

15. just-studies-are-different-from-thorough-scientific-research

16. lab-scientists-versus-internet-scientists

17. can-you-challenge-science?

18. the-myth-of-ritual-working

19.science-and-superstitions-how-rational-thinking-can-make-you-work-better

20. comets-are-not-harmful-or-bad-omens-so-enjoy-the-clestial-shows

21. explanation-of-mysterious-lights-during-earthquakes

22. science-can-tell-what-constitutes-the-beauty-of-a-rose

23. what-lessons-can-science-learn-from-tragedies-like-these

24. the-specific-traits-of-a-scientific-mind

25. science-and-the-paranormal

26. are-these-inventions-and-discoveries-really-accidental-and-intuitive like the journalists say?

27. how-the-brain-of-a-polymath-copes-with-all-the-things-it-does

28. how-to-make-scientific-research-in-india-a-success-story

29. getting-rid-of-plastic-the-natural-way

30. why-some-interesting-things-happen-in-nature

31. real-life-stories-that-proves-how-science-helps-you

32. Science and trust series:

a. how-to-trust-science-stories-a-guide-for-common-man

b. trust-in-science-what-makes-people-waver

c. standing-up-for-science-showing-reasons-why-science-should-be-trusted

You will find the entire list of discussions here: http://kkartlab.in/group/some-science/forum

( Please go through the comments section below to find reports/research results relating to science reported on a daily basis and watch videos based on science)

Get interactive...

Please contact us if you want us to add any information or scientific explanation on any topic that interests you. We will try our level best to give you the right information.

Our mail ID: kkartlabin@gmail.com

Discussion Forum

Proning

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 10. 0 Replies

Q: What is proning?Krishna: If you feel breathless during covid, as some patients experience mild respiratory distress who do not need a ventilator, or those who could progress to severe respiratory…Continue

Sci-Com Videos

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 10. 1 Reply

Science Today: Communicating ScienceHow to explain scientific ideas: 6 SIMPLE tips from a communication expertContinue

Qs people asked about science and my replies to them -Part 235

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 9. 1 Reply

Q: What are the differences and similarities of a polymath and an autodidact?Krishna: A polymath is a person of wide knowledge or learning. S/he is also a person whose expertise spans a significant…Continue

Effects of pregnant women smoking and drinking on their fetuses

Started by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa. Last reply by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa Apr 1. 2 Replies

                                     Ladies and gentlemen say 'no' to this toxic empowerment. We had a discussion on reforms recently. During the process some people expressed the opinion that  women…Continue

Comment Wall

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You need to be a member of Science Simplified! to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 9, 2021 at 10:22am

Complete chromosome 8 sequence reveals novel genes and disease risks

The full assembly of human chromosome 8 is reported this week in Nature. While on the outside this chromosome looks typical, being neither short nor long or distinctive, its DNA content and arrangement are of interest in primate and human evolution, in several immune and developmental disorders, and in chromosome sequencing structure and function generally.

This linear assembly is a first for a human autosome—a chromosome not involved in sex determination. The entire sequence of chromosome 8 is 146,259,671 bases. The completed assembly fills in the gap of more than 3 million bases missing from the current reference genome.

One of several intriguing characteristics of chromosome 8 is a fast-evolving region, where the mutation rate appears to be highly accelerated in humans and human-like species, in contrast to the rest of the human genome.

While chromosome 8 offers some insights into evolution and human biology, the researchers point out that the complete assembly of all human chromosomes would be necessary to acquire a fuller picture.

Glennis A. Logsdon et al, The structure, function and evolution of a complete human chromosome 8, Nature (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03420-7

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-chromosome-sequence-reveals-genes-dis...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 8, 2021 at 10:56am

Scientists Reverse Engineer mRNA Sequence of Moderna Vaccine

Stanford University researchers determined the code from spare drops in discarded vials of the COVID-19 vaccine and published it on GitHub.

Leftover drops in vials of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine allowed a group of researchers from Stanford University to determine the sequence of the mRNA for SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein that is used in the immunization, Motherboard reported March 29. The sequence has been posted on the open-access website GitHub.

“Sharing of sequence information for broadly used therapeutics has substantial benefit in design of improved clinical tools and precise diagnostics,” the authors write in their post. They explain that knowing the vaccine’s sequence will allow diagnostic labs to more easily differentiate between RNA from the vaccine versus that from an actual viral infection.

https://github.com/NAalytics/Assemblies-of-putative-SARS-CoV2-spike...

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/scientists-reverse-engin...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 7, 2021 at 8:56am

Researchers develop materials for oral delivery of insulin medication

A revolutionary technology developed  could dramatically improve the wellbeing of diabetic patients: an insulin oral delivery system that could replace traditional subcutaneous injections without the side effects caused by frequent injections.

Using prepared layers of nanosheets with insulin loaded in between layers to protect it, the researchers developed gastro-resistant imine-linked-covalent organic framework nanoparticles (nCOFs) that exhibited insulin protection in the stomach as well in diabetic test subjects whose sugar levels completely returned to normal within two hours after swallowing the nanoparticles.

Farah Benyettou et al. In vivo oral insulin delivery via covalent organic frameworks, Chemical Science (2021). DOI: 10.1039/D0SC05328G

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-materials-oral-delivery-insulin-medic...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 7, 2021 at 8:54am

Rise of the 'robo-plants', as scientists fuse nature with tech

Remote-controlled Venus flytrap "robo-plants" and crops that tell farmers when they are hit by disease could become reality after scientists developed a high-tech system for communicating with vegetation.

Researchers in Singapore linked up plants to electrodes capable of monitoring the weak electrical pulses naturally emitted by the greenery.

The scientists used the technology to trigger a Venus flytrap to snap its jaws shut at the push of a button on a .

They then attached one of its jaws to a  and got the contraption to pick up a piece of wire half a millimetre thick, and catch a small falling object.

The technology is in its early stages, but researchers think it could eventually be used to build advanced "plant-based robots" that can pick up a host of fragile objects which are too delicate for rigid, robotic arms. These kinds of nature robots can be interfaced with other artificial robots (to make) hybrid systems.

The system can also pick up signals emitted by plants, raising the possibility that farmers will be able to detect problems with their  at an early stage.

"By monitoring the plants' electrical signals, we may be able to detect possible distress signals and abnormalities. Farmers may find out when a disease is in progress, even before full-blown symptoms appear on the crops.

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-robo-plants-scientists-fuse-nature-te...

**

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 7, 2021 at 8:50am

A safer way to deploy bacteria as environmental sensors

In recent years, scientists have developed many strains of engineered bacteria that can be used as sensors to detect environmental contaminants such as heavy metals. If deployed in the natural environment, these sensors could help scientists track how pollutant levels change over time, over a wide geographic area.

MIT engineers have now devised a way to make this kind of deployment safer, by encasing bacterial  in a tough hydrogel shell that prevents them from escaping into the environment and potentially spreading modified genes to other organisms.

"Right now there are a lot of whole-cell biosensors being developed, but applying them in the real world is a challenge because we don't want any genetically modified organisms to be able to exchange genetic material with wild-type microbes.

Researchers showed that they could embed E. coli into hydrogel spheres, allowing them to detect the contaminants they're looking for while remaining isolated from other organisms. The shells also help to protect the sensors from environmental damage.

Tzu-Chieh Tang et al. Hydrogel-based biocontainment of bacteria for continuous sensing and computation, Nature Chemical Biology (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41589-021-00779-6

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-safer-deploy-bacteria-environmental-s...

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Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 6, 2021 at 6:30am

The problems we face with

Forever Chemicals

Forever chemicals are used in everything from rain jackets to jet fuel. But the chemistry behind what makes them useful also makes them stick around in the environment and us...forever?

Could microbes save us from PFAS? You can read about the study we mention here: https://cen.acs.org/environment/persistent-pollutants/microbes-save...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 6, 2021 at 6:22am

Scientists develop a safe, cheap technology for disinfection of pac...

Russian researchers have developed an inexpensive, safe, and reliable surface disinfection technology for packed eggs. This technology helps to kill bacteria, including salmonella, on eggshells. Also, it allows growing broiler chickens with strong immunity to viral diseases. Packed eggs are disinfected with an electron beam for 50 nanoseconds (one-billionth of a second). Disinfection takes place in plastic containers. The description of the technology was published in Food and Bioproducts Processing.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 6, 2021 at 6:09am

Geoengineering is just a partial solution to fight climate change

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Study reveals uncertainty in how much carbon the ocean absorbs over...

The ocean's "biological pump" describes the many marine processes that work to take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and transport it deep into the ocean, where it can remain sequestered for centuries. This ocean pump is a powerful regulator of atmospheric carbon dioxide and an essential ingredient in any global climate forecast.

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Making cleaner, greener plastics from waste fish parts

Polyurethanes, a type of plastic, are nearly everywhere—in shoes, clothes, refrigerators and construction materials. But these highly versatile materials can have a major downside. Derived from crude oil, toxic to synthesize, and slow to break down, conventional polyurethanes are not environmentally friendly. Today, researchers discuss devising what they say should be a safer, biodegradable alternative derived from fish waste—heads, bones, skin and guts—that would otherwise likely be discarded.

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Paleopharmaceuticals from Baltic amber might fight drug-resistant i...

For centuries, people in Baltic nations have used ancient amber for medicinal purposes. Even today, infants are given amber necklaces that they chew to relieve teething pain, and people put pulverized amber in elixirs and ointments for its purported anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties. Now, scientists have pinpointed compounds that help explain Baltic amber's therapeutic effects and that could lead to new medicines to combat antibiotic-resistant infections.

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Doping by athletes could become tougher to hide with new detection ...

As the world awaits the upcoming Olympic games, a new method for detecting doping compounds in urine samples could level the playing field for those trying to keep athletics clean. Today, scientists report an approach using ion mobility-mass spectrometry to help regulatory agencies detect existing dopants and future "designer" compounds.

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 6, 2021 at 6:07am

A sun reflector for Earth? Scientists explore the potential risks and benefits

Nine of the hottest years in human history have occurred in the last decade. Without a major shift in this climate trajectory, the future of life on Earth is in question. Should humans, whose fossil-fueled society is driving climate change, use technology to put the brakes on global warming?

Every month since September 2019 the Climate Intervention Biology Working Group, a team of internationally recognized experts in  science and ecology, has gathered remotely to bring science to bear on that question and the consequences of geoengineering a cooler Earth by reflecting a portion of the sun's radiation away from the planet—a climate intervention strategy known as solar radiation modification (SRM).

The group's seminal paper, "Potential ecological impacts of climate intervention by reflecting sunlight to cool Earth," was published in the most recent Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The costs and technology needed to reflect the Sun's heat back into space are currently more attainable than other climate intervention ideas like absorbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. 

Scientific investigation into how a climate intervention strategy known as solar radiation modification (SRM), in tandem with greenhouse gas emissions reduction, would affect the natural world is being studied.

The feasibility of planetary-wide SRM efforts hinge on accurate predictions of its myriad outcomes provided by the well-established computer simulations of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP).

While climate models have become quite advanced in predicting climate outcomes of various geoengineering scenarios, we have very little understanding of what the possible risks of these scenarios might be for species and natural systems. Are the risks for extinction, species community change, and the need for organisms to migrate to survive under SRM greater than those of climate change, or does SRM reduce the risks caused by climate change?

Most of the GeoMIP models only simulate abiotic variables, but what about all of the living things that are affected by climate and rely on energy from the sun?

"We need to better understand the possible impacts of SRM on everything from soil microorganisms to monarch butterfly migrations to marine systems."

Phoebe L. Zarnetske el al., "Potential ecological impacts of climate intervention by reflecting sunlight to cool Earth," PNAS (2021). www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1921854118

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-sun-reflector-earth-scientists-explor...

Comment by Dr. Krishna Kumari Challa on April 5, 2021 at 9:19am

Climate Change is affecting you personally. Here's how

 

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